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How To Talk About Sexual Orientation With Your Kids

Your children will probably ask questions related to gender, sexuality, and sexual orientation.

The best way to get ready for those conversations is to prepare yourself—and we’re here to help.

Don’t worry if you are out of your depth! It’s okay!

The subject of sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender can be uncomfortable for many people, particularly teens or young children. Acknowledge your nerves and possible lack of knowledge on the subject. Discuss finding resources, such as websites, books, shows, or movies, to help you understand their thoughts and feelings.

According to the newest survey of the general American population, the number of people identifying as LGBTQ is at an all-time high.

The newest Gallup poll puts the number at 5.6%, which projected to the whole population estimates that around 18 million American adults are part of this group.

It is not surprising that younger Americans, especially those under 23, are more comfortable publicly disclosing this information, while only 2% of those over 55 identify as such.

How to talk about sexual orientation with your kids

Key Takeaways:

  • 18 million adults identify as LGBTQ+ making it important to talk to our children about their identity.
  • Not everyone who identifies differently is open about it and so having an open line of communication can help your kids feel less alienated.
  • It’s also important to talk to our kids because even if they don’t share one of these identities; it can affect how they treat other people at school.

We know that more people than ever are openly identifying as non-heterosexual or non-cis-gendered.

Maybe a member of your family falls into this growing category; maybe you do.

The odds are that your children will have questions related to gender, sexuality and sexual orientation.mother.ly

In this video you’ll hear from several youths in Los Angeles, CA about their coming out process, support, and embracing their identities:

You might also want to read: When & How To Talk To Your Child About Pornography?